A history of Long Island, from its earliest settlement to the present day - Vol I, II, and III
1902 & 1903 Versions of Vol 2 & 3


Authored by Peter Ross and William Pelletreau
A History of Long Island from its earliest settlement to the present time 
By Peter Ross, originally published in New York, 1902
reproduction of the original editions

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CD Content
A History of Long Island Peter Ross - A History of Long Island from its earliest settlement to the present time  By Peter Ross and William Pelletreau, originally published in New York, 1902,.  1903 Version also included of Part II & III since they differ from the 1902 Version.  Part I of both editions are the same.  Part III of 1903 edition authored is by William Pelletreau since Peter Ross died in 1902.

Sections include:

Vol. I. Chapter I. Topography of the island
Vol. I. Chapter II. The Indians and their lands
Vol. I. Chapter III. The decadence of the Aborigines
Vol. I. Chapter IV. Discovery
Vol. I. Chapter V. The Dutch
Vol. I. Chapter VI. The British government
Vol. I. Chapter VII. Some early families and their descendants
Vol. I. Chapter VIII. Some old families in Queens and Kings
Vol. I. Chapter IX. Some primitive characteristics
Vol. I. Chapter X. Slavery on Long Island
Vol. I. Chapter XI. Early Congregational and Presbyterian churches
Vol. I. Chapter XII. Religious progress in Kings County
Vol. I. Chapter XIII. Persecutions
Vol. I. Chapter XIV. Captain Kidd and other navigators
Vol. I. Chapter XV. The ante-revolution struggle
Vol. I. Chapter XVI. The Battle of Brooklyn
Vol. I. Chapter XVII. The retreat from Long Island
Vol. I. Chapter XVIII. The British occupation
Vol. I. Chapter XIX. Some Long Island loyalists
Vol. I. Chapter XX. A few revolutionary heroes
Vol. I. Chapter XXI. The War of 1812
Vol. I. Chapter XXII. The chain of forts
Vol. I. Chapter XXIII. The story of educational progress
Vol. I. Chapter XXIV. Internal communications
Vol. I. Chapter XXV. Kings County
Vol. I. Chapter XXVI. Flatlands
Vol. I. Chapter XXVII. Flatbush
Vol. I. Chapter XXVIII. New Utrecht
Vol. I. Chapter XXIX. Bushwick
Vol. I. Chapter XXX. Gravesend
Vol. I. Chapter XXXI. Coney Island
Vol. I. Chapter XXXII. The story of Brooklyn Village to the beginning of the revolutionary movement
Vol. I. Chapter XXXIII. Brooklyn
Vol. I. Chapter XXXIV. The Village of Brooklyn
Vol. I. Chapte XXXV. The first city
Vol. I. Chapter XXXVI. Church development
Vol. I. Chapter XXXVII. The era of the Civil War, 1865-1870
Vol. I. Chapter XXXVIII. Intellectual and spiritual life
Vol. I. Chapter XXXIX. The Civil War
Vol. I. Chapter XL. The death grapple of the struggle
Vol. I. Chapter XLI. The splendid closing record
Vol. I. Chapter XLII. "The end of an auld sang"
Vol. I. Chapter XLIII. Queens
Vol. I. Chapter XLIV. Flushing
Vol. I. Chapter XLV. Newtown
Vol. I. Chapter XLVI. Jamaica
Vol. I. Chapter XLVII. Long Island City
Vol. I. Chapter XLVIII. Summer resorts
Vol. I. Chapter XLIX. The medical profession on Long Island
Vol. I. Chapter L. The Medical Society of the County of Kings
Vol. I. Chapter LI. Various medical societies
Vol. I. Chapter LII. Dentists in Brooklyn
Vol. I. Chapter LIII. The bench and bar
Vol. I. Chapter LIV. Freemasonry on Long Island
Vol. I. Chapter LV. The social world of Long Island
Vol. I. Chapter LVI. Old county families
Vol. I. Chapter LVII. Notes and illustrations
Vol. I. Chapter LVIII. The Catholic church on Long Island
Vol. I. Chapter LIX. Nassau County
Vol. I. Chapter LX. Hempstead
Vol. I. Chapter LXI. North Hempstead
Vol. I. Chapter LXII. Oyster Bay
Vol. I. Chapter LXIII. Suffolk County
Vol. I. Chapter LXIV. Huntington
Vol. I. Chapter LXV. Babylon
Vol. I. Chapter LXVI. Smithtown
Vol. I. Chapter LXVII. Islip
Vol. I. Chapter LXVIII. Brookhaven
Vol. I. Chapter LXIX. Riverhead
Vol. I. Chapter LXX. Southold
Vol. I. Chapter LXXI. Shelter Island
Vol. I. Chapter LXXII. Southampton
Vol. I. Chapter LXXIII. East Hampton
Vol. II. History of Long Island
Vol. III. History of Long Island. Biographical

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